Maine Coon Cats Problems

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The Maine Coon cat is one of the most popular cat breeds. With their large size, curly coat and friendly personality they are also a very recognizable breed. But donג€™t let their good looks fool you; these cats have plenty of natural difficulties that need to be taken into consideration when raising one as a pet. If care is not taken and the proper environment created for them, they can become problematic and require extra attention to keep them happy and healthy.
Before getting a Maine Coon as a pet itג€™s essential to understand what all the fuss is about with this breed, as well as know what to look out for if you choose to adopt one. Here we will take you through some of the more common problems you may encounter with your new Maine Coon addition, so that you can be prepared if the same thing happens to you.

What issues do Maine Coons have?

The Maine Coon is one of the more common breeds. With their large size, they have a lot of health problems associated with them. These include obesity, diabetes, kidney failure, and urinary tract infections.
Additional problems include hypothyroidism, low blood sugar and respiratory difficulties in cats that are not kept cool enough.
There are many reasons why the Maine Coon can develop these health issues including poor diet choices, living in an unhygienic environment, and weight gain due to lack of exercise. But there is a way to prevent this from happening if you take care of your cat by providing a healthy diet and plenty of exercise.

What are the cons of owning a Maine Coon cat?

The Maine Coon cat is one of the most popular breeds, but they have some natural difficulties that need to be taken into consideration when raising them as a pet. As with any other animal, it is important to understand what all the fuss is about with this breed and know what to look out for. The following are just some of the more common problems you may encounter with your new Maine Coon addition.
Maine Coons have a tendency to overheat in warmer climates
They aren’t always able to adapt well in a new home if their needs are not met
They can live well into old age and require extra care as they age

Are Maine Coon cats hard to care for?

If youג€™re considering getting a Maine Coon cat as a pet, itג€™s important to know what they are like. They are very particular when it comes to their environment and can be difficult to care for. For example, they need at least two hours of exercise each day in order to maintain good health. If this isnג€™t done on a regular basis, your Maine Coons will become very demanding and may even react out of frustration.
Another huge difficulty with this breed is their curly coat. It needs constant care and attention in order to look its best and not be overly matted or tangled. The coat can also be heavy at times, so you need to make sure that your Maine Coon doesnג€™t get too warm while resting in the sun. To prevent matting, there are plenty of specific grooming tips that you can follow online or seek the advice of a professional groomer if needed.

What is the life expectancy of a Maine Coon?

One of the most common problems with Maine Coons is their short-lived lives. This can be attributed to a number of things, including the fact that they are such large cats that require at least two litter boxes, as well as their tendency for health issues like diabetes and kidney disease. Despite these difficulties, many Maine Coons live happy and healthy lives with proper attention from their owners.
In general, the life expectancy of a Maine Coon cat is about ten years old. Itג€™s important to remember that these statistics are for domestic cats only; in a feral environment or in a shelter environment, the life span will be shorter than this.

Emilia Warren

Emilia Warren

Hi, my name is Emilia Warren, and I’m a 28-year-old Maine Coon breeder from the great state of Maine.
As you may know, Maine Coons are the official state cat of Maine, and for a good reason – they’re awesome!

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